How to Manage Gum Disease

Gum disease management needs a rigorous program of evaluation and disease control in order to minimize its effect on the mouth and body. The biggest reason for tooth loss in the modern world is periodontal disease and not tooth decay.

Gum Disease Risk Factors
If you are 35-40, you are at the age where gum disease can become severe. Here are some of the strongest indicators that you could develop gum disease.

• Age
• Use of Tobacco
• Poor Nutrition
• Genetics

Knowing The Symptoms
Gum disease may progress painlessly, producing few obvious signs even in the late stages of the disease. Certain symptoms may present themselves including:

• Gums that bleed during and after tooth brushing
• Red, swollen or tender gums
• Persistent bad breath or bad taste in the mouth
• Receding gums
• Formation of deep pockets between teeth and gums
• Loose or shifting teeth
• Changes in the way your teeth fit together upon biting down, or in the fit of partial dentures

Treating Gum Disease: Early Non-Surgical Treatments
Before gum disease becomes persistently bad, your dentist can perform the following treatments:

• Professional dental cleaning
• Scaling and root planing

Prevention Starts With You
Ultimately, healthy gums start with you. Good dental hygiene, including regular brushing and flossing, will help prevent gum disease.

• Brush your teeth twice per day, using a fluoride-based toothpaste. You should brush for at least two minutes per arch, using a circular motion
• Rinse with a fluoride mouthwash solution twice per day for thirty seconds to kill bacteria
• Floss with a wax-based dental floss taking time to go in between each tooth all the way down to the gum line
• See your dentist twice per year for a checkup and cleaning
• Give up smoking and smokeless tobacco products

Contact Us
For more information about gum disease, call 203-433-0384 for Branford Office or 203-285-8163 for Milford Office.

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